insectsandflight.com

all pictures © robin williams

November 2023 - wildlife: from the Somerset Levels

November 27th 2023. It was not particularly nice down at Catcott Lows, much colder, windy, mixed sun and overcast. However, it was notable for the first duck of the season, as a matter of fact four turned up yesterday but this was a more serious event, all teal and far-off, but pleasing for all that. 

Common teal, Anas crecca - the first of the many

Marsh harrier, Circus aeruginosus m

Marsh harrier, Circus aeruginosus m 

Marsh harrier, Circus aeruginosus m

Marsh harrier, Circus aeruginosus m

 

Greylag geese, Anser anser

Grey heron, Ardea cinerea

Cormorant, Phalacrocorax carbo

Mute swan, Cygnus olor

Mute swan, Cygnus olor

November 23rd 2023. It is time to make use of, and show off some of the many trail camera images taken over the last month or so. This little batch was taken in the early hours of the day looking out over the area in front of the study. It is good to see the badgers, they have had bad press over recent years.

Badger, Meles meles

Badger, Meles meles

Badger, Meles meles

Badger, Meles meles

November 21st 2023. Marsh harriers had been reported appearing on Catcott Lows recently. I needed some fresh air and went down in hope, but ith no certainty. One appeared a couple of times, and took pictures, but the light was far from perfect. I was not displeased with the results though. It is usually difficult to photograph against dark trees but this time the autofocus behaved better than expected.

Marsh harrier, Circus aeruginosus m

Marsh harrier, Circus aeruginosus m

Marsh harrier, Circus aeruginosus m

November 14th 2023. A quick visit to Catcott Lows just confirmed there was no sign of winter waterfowl as yet. However there were little parties of Pied wagtails on Tealham Moor at last - a common event at this time or when the first floods appear.

Pied wagtail, Motacilla alba

Pied wagtail, Motacilla alba

Pied wagtail, Motacilla alba

November 12th 2023. Various pictures from the trail camera at home. Although I have been involved with these over a number of years, I am still perfecting my techniques, corrections on the computer, and setting the various levels on the camera itself. 

Roebuck, Capreolus capreolus

Roebuck, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

Roebuck, Capreolus capreolus

Roebuck, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

 November 11th 2023. It is taking a bit of getting accustomed to realising there are no more insects and the long lens has to come out onec more, checking the settings and cleaning the outfit. I have made a number of journeys around the moors recently, particularly Tealham and Mark Moors. A mixed bag of pictures has resulted, most taken in pretty murky weather. 

Grey heron, Ardea cinerea 

Grey heron, Ardea cinerea

Common buzzard, Buteo buteo

Common buzzard, Buteo buteo

It has been good to see the starlings pouring back onto the moors once more. There have been such worrying reports of the reduction in their numbers recently. They are the creatures that really signify the start of winter locally.

Starlings, Sturnus vulgaris

Starlings, Sturnus vulgaris

Starlings, Sturnus vulgaris

November 11th 2023. Wandering round opening the curtains in the morning, a slight movement caught my eye. A brief glimpse of a couple of Roe deer gathering themselves together before they dashed across to next door. It is the first time they have been seen in the open, however briefly. So good to see them again.

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

November 1st 2023. What a month we have just finished! Not just for the astonishing numbers of insects we encountered It has been a month of unexpected sunshine, warmth and growth, which has brought life to the garden and the terrace. But it has been much more of a promblem for the website. I went into the study one morning a month ago to find that someone had taken over my website lock, stock and barrel. I was unable to enter the site - 'contact my provider.' And so it remained until very recently. Why anyone should want a local wildlife website; more seriously, how could they have done it so easily? It seems that someone took over the 'strong' password I had (recently on site), then told the host that the new password made them owners of site. The host simply handed over the whole website to this stranger. I can understand someone altering the content but not the simple acquiescence to handing over the whole website, without any query at all. They went on to say, 'Please note there are several security layers which ensures the security and privacy of each customer. The client area can be only accessed by a person who has the credentials and has access to the either phone or email used for it'. Why was it that someone was able to snatch the site so easily? There appears to be no ready explanation for this - beware. It is now back with a new password but only after providing an affidavit as to my identity. Fortunately, I had been continuing to photograph and process the images off-line during this month-long period.

Roebuck, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

Roebuck, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

Roebuck, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus

Roe deer, Capreolus capreolus